A future less ordinary

Government and Politics

Government and Politics

Our Subject

What does democracy really mean? How powerful are prime ministers? If you enjoy debating current affairs and politics and would like to study a subject that is relevant to your everyday life, then you could be a perfect candidate for an A-level in Government and Politics. You don’t need to have taken the subject at GCSE level in order to study it at Bilborough Sixth Form College. We say it’s more important to bring your lively and enquiring mind, an interest in politics and current affairs, a desire to explore new ideas, and the ability to communicate your thoughts effectively.

To study Government and Politics at Bilborough, you need a minimum grade C/4 or above in English GCSE, and you should have a strong interest in politics, ideally with some knowledge of the UK political system.

Our links with HE

As well as giving you a solid foundation for a possible career in politics, this qualification can be a useful grounding for a wide range of careers, combined with science, social science and humanities subjects.  A high proportion of Bilborough Sixth Form College Government and Politics students go on to related courses at degree level and, for some, this has led to great things … one former student, for example, is now a senior civil servant in the Cabinet Office.


Course Structure

Your first year (AS) will introduce you to the main institutions and workings of the UK political system. The course consists of two units (‘People and Politics’ and ‘Governing the UK’) and each unit will be assessed by a 1.5-hour examination at the end of the year.

In the second year (A2) you will look at American politics, making comparisons with the UK system. The two units (‘The Politics of the USA’ and ‘The Government of the USA’) will again be assessed with two 1.5-hour exams at the end.


Inspiration

A few years ago a student came to the induction at Bilborough Sixth Form College just to have a look, discovered it was for him, and got involved in local politics. During Year 13, alongside his A-levels, he fought an election campaign and became one of the youngest district councillors in the country. TV cameras came to college to film his success story, which was shown on national TV. In 2013 he stood in the Nottinghamshire County Council elections and became the youngest ever Nottinghamshire County Councillor.







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